Assistive Robotic Glove Price List

How Much Does an Assistive Robotic Glove Cost?

The simple answer is from $2,000 to $7,000 US.

Assistive Robotic Glove Price Table

The following devices are already on the market or nearing commercialization:

Bionic HandPrice (USD)Current Availability
Carbonhand$7,000Sweden, Norway, Belgium, Germany, Italy, and Japan
Emovo Assist$???Currently conducting trials in Switzerland
Neomano$2,000U.S., U.S territories, and Canada
NUADA$4,000Global1
Tenoexo$???Still in development

1 NUADA appears to sell its device worldwide through direct shipment. However, we are still working to confirm this.

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For background information, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

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Current Options for Assistive Robotic Gloves

Our Assistive Robotic Glove category includes any bionic device that assists people with a hand impairment despite having their natural hand intact. This impairment may be the result of stroke, partial paralysis, arthritis, or any other disease or injury.

The good news is that we are seeing an increasing number of these devices either already on the market or approaching commercialization.

Below, you will find brief descriptions of these devices with links to more detailed articles.

Emovo Assist Feature Image
Carbonhand Feature Image

Carbonhand from Bioservo

The Carbonhand is a soft, assistive robotic glove that uses powered artificial tendons to augment the grip of people with insufficient strength in their hands.

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NUADA Glove Feature Image

NUADA Glove

With its compact design and intuitive control system, Nuada’s soft robotic glove is the most exciting assistive hand device that we’ve seen so far.

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Neomano Feature Image

Neomano Glove

The Neomano is a soft, assistive robotic glove for people with movement in their wrist and arm but little to no strength in their hands.

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For background information, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

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Emovo Assist Hand Exoskeleton

Emovo Assist is a hand exoskeleton designed by Emovo Care to help those with mild or partial weakness on one side of the body.

What’s On This Page?

A Quick Look at Emovo Assist

Emovo Assist is still in its trial phase. It is similar to the Tenoexo Hand Exoskeleton in that they are both hand exoskeletons as compared to gloves. And it is similar to the Neomano Glove in that they both rely on simple push-button control systems, though the Emovo does actively open digits as well as close them. By comparison, Neomano only actively assists with finger closure (but not the thumb), relying on users to simply relax their fingers to help release a grasped object.

The following video provides a good overview of Emovo Assist:

We describe individual features in the relevant sections below.

Key Features

Grip Patterns & Control System

As mentioned, Emovo Assist is controlled by simple open and close buttons, though a mobile phone app can be used in place of an actual button controller.

There do not appear to be any grip pattern options. The way that the Emovo opens or closes is dictated solely by whether or not an artificial tendon is present for the digit in question. For example, if artificial tendons are present only for the thumb and forefinger, then Emovo will only help open/close those two digits. Whether other digits also open and close depends entirely on natural control.

Proportional Force

Emovo does not currently appear to support the use of proportional force. When a digit opens or closes, it does so at a predetermined speed.

Sensory Feedback

Emovo does not offer sensory feedback because the natural hand remains intact and usually provides adequate sensory feedback on its own.

Size & Weight

We do not yet have any information on Emovo’s weight or dimensions. We have submitted this question to the manufacturer and will update this section as soon as we receive a reply.

Lift Capacity & Grip Strength

We do not yet have any information on Emovo’s lift capacity or grip strength. We have submitted this question to the manufacturer and will update this section as soon as we receive a reply.

Durability

We do not yet have any information on Emovo’s durability. Normally, we rely on the results of our User Satisfaction Surveys to gauge durability. Absent that, we refer to the terms of the warranty. But since Emovo has not yet been released commercially, neither of these information sources is available to us.

Water and Dust Resistance

Emovo houses all of its electronic components in a control unit, which is separate from the hand module. The hand module consists of only cloth and waterproof tendons, so it can safely be used in wet environments.

We do not yet have an official statement on dust resistance, though we suspect that the hand module is fully dust resistant due to the material used in its construction.

Glove Options

Emovo’s hand module already consists of a glove that is used to anchor the artificial tendons at various points.

We have asked the company if it is possible (or advisable) to wear a glove over the exoskeleton. We will update this section as soon as we receive a reply.

Batteries

We do not yet have any information on the type of batteries used to power Emovo, how long their charge lasts, or how long it takes to recharge them. We have submitted these questions to the company and will update this section as soon as we receive a reply.

User Software

We do know that users can use a smartphone to control Emovo instead of a physical push-button controller. But we do not know if the phone app has any other capabilities. We have submitted this question to the company and will update this section as soon as we receive a reply.

Price

We do not yet have a price for Emovo. We have submitted this question to the company and will update this section as soon as we receive a reply.

Availability

As Emovo is still a prototype, we do not yet have any information on its official launch date or its geographic availability at launch. We have submitted these questions to the company and will update this section as soon as we receive a reply.

Warranty

We do not yet know the terms of Emovo’s warranty or its options, if any. We have submitted this question to the company and will update this section as soon as we receive a reply.

User Feedback Survey & Results

Survey

We have not yet created a survey for the Emovo and won’t do so until it is released commercially.

Results

Without a survey, there are of course no survey results.

However, we did find this video, which captures the initial impact of the Emovo prototype on some of the trial patients:

Considerations Before Buying Emovo Assist

We don’t have any opinion of Emovo Assist at this time, though the main consideration when it’s released commercially will be the absence of a track record with consumers.

For more information on these types of devices, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

Click here for more information on Emovo Care.

To have a better understanding of the company’s current status, see this video from December 2021:

An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves

Assistive robotic gloves hold great promise to restore lost hand functionality after a stroke, disease, or accident. They can also help with rehabilitation.

What is a Robotic Glove?

Buckle up — the world of robotic gloves is a bit muddled.

First, we’d prefer the term “bionic gloves” but this has been coopted by a company of the same name that makes specialized gloves for many different sports and activities. However, these are not powered gloves. Instead, they enhance grip strength through a combination of compression, support, and pressure distribution. Here is an excellent description of this approach, even though this video is nearly a decade old:

Next, there are numerous devices designed solely to assist with rehabilitation, often following a stroke or other neurological event. These devices do not assist the user with daily activities. Instead, they use a combination of technologies to encourage patients to perform their daily rehabilitation exercises. Here is one example that uses a primarily physical model:

Here is another device that uses primarily virtual training:

There are also hand components of military or industrial exoskeletons, as well as gloves with haptic feedback that can be used to control robotic arms or other scientific devices.

To be clear, we don’t cover any of these types of gloves, though the rehabilitation devices target the same audience that we do and can be incredibly useful.

We cover only assistive devices, though they may also have rehabilitative benefits.

When talking about these types of assistive devices, it is best to differentiate them by their capacity to assist users. For example, if a user can move his hand but simply lacks the strength to perform various tasks, a device like the NUADA glove might be the ideal solution. It never forces the digits to move but it can augment the user’s grip sufficiently to lift 40 kilograms. This is roughly equivalent to the average maximum grip force of a natural hand (i.e. the unisex average).

The Carbonhand (formerly the SEM Glove) from Bioservo is a similar device but does, in some cases, physically move digits that the user may not be able to move on her own:

Because of this potential for forced movement, the Carbonhand offers significantly less grip augmentation with the ability to lift only 2 kilograms. Forced movement and grip augmentation are related because forced movement combined with high levels of augmentation might lead to injury.

If you can’t move your fingers very well but have the ability to at least relax them (i.e. to release a grip), the NeoMano might be the right choice for you.

This device definitely forces the index user’s index and middle fingers to close but only under the direct control of the user via control buttons. Again, grip strength is limited to the ability to lift 2 kilograms.

Finally, this next example — the Tenoexo — is still just a prototype. It is a true hand exoskeleton and can help users with a broad range of hand impairments. Control is enacted via various types of buttons, voice control, or glove sensors, depending on the user’s requirements.

Basic Design Elements of a Robotic Glove

Before we started researching robotic gloves, we assumed that they would be simpler than bionic hands. However, designers of assistive gloves/exoskeletons must also deal with the fact that the natural hand is still present, which not only changes the motion dynamics but also introduces the risk of injury.

So, don’t make the same mistake that we made and assume that these devices are in any way simple. As a bit of a wake-up call, consider this chart identifying the basic technologies that make up robotic gloves, courtesy of a study titled, A Review of Active Hand Exoskeletons for Rehabilitation and Assistance:

Robotic Glove Technology Components

And here are the additional details for just one main component — Actuation:

Robotic Glove Actuation Components

Some of these components may be complimentary, such as the different types of potential sensory feedback in the first chart, while others may be competing alternatives, such as the Pneumatic vs Hydraulic options.

Why are we telling you all this? Because many of these potential components are design choices that can significantly impact the value of a robotic glove to you, so you will need to understand them to make a wise purchase decision.

We plan to help you with this task by writing articles on the underlying technologies for robotic gloves, just as we’ve done for bionic arms & hands and bionic legs & feet. But we wanted you to know that you’re going to have to put in considerable effort to master this material.

The Current Commercial Robotic Glove Landscape

To our knowledge, here is a brief description of all the commercial assistive hand devices that are either already on the market or will be in the foreseeable future:

DeviceDescriptionPriceAvailability
NeomanoA soft robotic glove that can actively help the user open and close their index and middle fingers at the press of a button. Enables people with hand paralysis to perform daily activities like holding a drink, brushing their teeth, or turning a doorknob to open a door. Can hold up to 2 kilograms.$2,000 USCurrently for sale
NUADAA soft robotic glove that uses thin, breathable, flexible, and smart textiles combined with sensors and powered tendons to help users grip objects. The powered tendons follow the movement of the natural hand and then automatically lock in to secure the grip. Can also ratchet to a tighter grip in response to an explicit user action. Is capable of holding up to 40 kilograms.$4,000 USDecember 2021
CarbonHandPreviously called the “SEM Glove”. A soft robotic glove similar in concept to that of the NUADA, though not as compact. It uses pressure sensors and powered tendons to proportionally augment grip. The more pressure applied naturally, the more the CarbonHand augments the grip.$7,000 USCurrently for sale
Tenoexo A true hand exoskeleton with multiple control options including various types of buttons, voice control, glove sensors. Because of this, it has the potential to assist patients with a broader range of hand impairments.???Still a prototype

We are certain that there are more devices than this at or near commercialization around the globe. The problem is that there are so many projects in development, plus a great many purely rehabilitative devices, that it is taking a lot of time and effort to sift through them all.

This article is just the start of our work in this area. We will now begin writing articles on the individual devices listed above, their underlying technologies, and any other devices that we encounter along the way.

As we do this, we will eventually evolve this article into A Complete Guide for Robotic Gloves, as we have done for the other areas that we cover in human bionics.

Have Some Information About This Subject That Can Help Us?

For those of you who don’t know, we are a volunteer group whose primary goal is to help those with physical or neurological disabilities to understand their bionic technology options free of commercial influence.

If you have knowledge of this subject area and would like to help us educate others, please don’t hesitate to contact us using this form:

Tenoexo Hand Exoskeleton

The Tenoexo hand exoskeleton can help someone with a broad range of hand impairments to grip objects using several different control options.

What’s On This Page?

A Quick Look at the Tenoexo Hand Exoskeleton

The Tenoexo is not yet a commercial product. It is the result of a research collaboration between the Rehabilitation Engineering Laboratory of ETH Zurich, Professor Jumpei Arata of Kyushu University in Japan, and Professor Gregory Fischer at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA.

The following video provides a good overview of a recent version of the Tenoexo. Note, however, that the use of a myoelectric armband to control the device has been discontinued because it was not robust enough for daily assistance.

We describe individual features in the relevant sections below but observe how a) this device will physically move your digits, and b) how gently it does this. These two features are connected. The more you allow an assistive hand device to force digits to open/close, the more careful you have to be to avoid injuring those digits.

Key Features

Grip Patterns & Control System

Tenoexo either has or is exploring various control mechanisms. These include buttons (i.e. large push buttons, bite buttons, sip-and-puff), voice control, and the use of a sensor glove linking the touch of an object to the intention to grasp it (see the Carbonhand for another assistive device that uses pressure sensors like this).

Regardless of the control method, a slider on the back of the Tenoexo is used to manually position the thumb. The diverse positioning of the thumb is what gives the Tenoexo the ability to perform multiple grip patterns, as demonstrated in the first half of this video (this repeats some of the preceding video’s footage but, this time, pay special attention to the thumb):

When attempting to grasp an object, Tenoexo uses a compliant 3-​layered sliding spring mechanism to passively adapt to the shape of an object.

Proportional Force

Tenoexo does not currently offer proportional force. With such a low maximum grip force, this is not as pressing a requirement as it is with bionic hands, which can sometimes exert too much force for certain tasks.

Sensory Feedback

Tenoexo does not offer sensory feedback because the natural hand remains intact and usually provides adequate sensory feedback on its own.

Size & Weight

Tenoexo’s hand module weighs only 148 grams. Its myoelectric armband weighs 93 grams, and its backpack (with actuators and onboard computer) weighs 560 grams.

The Tenoexo’s hand module can be adapted to match the size of an individual user’s hand. For a “standard” medium-sized adult hand, the dimensions of the hand module are roughly 300 × 110 × 25 mm3 including the thumb. In general, the device extends from the lower portion of the forearm to just beyond the fingertips and adds a maximum of 2 cm of height to the back of the hand.

The backpack dimensions are 217 x 104 × 35 mm3

Lift Capacity & Grip Strength

The Tenoexo can only lift 1/2 kilogram. It generates a grip force of only 4.5 Newtons per finger. By comparison, the average maximum grip force for women is 292 Newtons, and, for men, 517 Newtons. The average grip force used in daily activities is 70 Newtons.

In other words, the Tenoexo is currently designed for light-duty tasks only.

Durability

We do not yet have any information on the durability of the Tenoexo. Normally, we rely on the results of our user satisfaction surveys to gauge durability. Absent that, we refer to the terms of the warranty. But since the Tenoexo is not yet a commercial product, neither of these information sources is available to us.

Water and Dust Resistance

Tenoexo’s hand module is free of electronics and is thus considered dust-resistant and protected against spraying water. An official IP rating has not yet been established for the device.

Glove Options

A specially designed glove can be used to attach the Tenoexo to the hand, though we do not yet have any video footage of this. Researchers are also working on additional attachment systems that will allow the use of commercial gloves.

Batteries

Batteries of different sizes and capacities can be connected via the Tenoexo’s power cable. A standard set of battery options has not yet been determined for the commercial version of the Tenoexo.

User Software

The Tenoexo does have an Android application that allows users to do the following:

  • change the force range and closing speed;
  • select between two grasp types;
  • configure the control system/intention detection strategies.

We will post a video of this application as soon as one is available.

Price

As the Tenoexo is not yet a commercial product, its eventual price has not yet been established.

Availability

Again, as this is still a prototype, we do not yet have any information on the official launch date for the Tenoexo or the geographic availability at launch. Current estimates are that the launch date may still be a few years away.

Warranty

Again, as this is still a prototype, we do not yet have any information on the Tenoexo’s eventual warranty policy.

User Feedback Survey & Results

Survey

We have not yet created a survey for the Tenoexo and won’t do so until it is released commercially.

Results

Without a survey, there are of course no survey results.

Considerations Before Buying a Tenoexo Hand Exoskeleton

We don’t have any opinion of the Tenoexo at this time, though the main consideration when it’s released commercially will be the absence of a track record with consumers.

For more information on these types of devices, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

Click here for more information on the Tenoexo research project.

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CarbonHand User Satisfaction Survey

This page contains our User Satisfaction Survey for Bioservo’s Carbonhand. If you are currently a Carbonhand user or have been one previously, please share your experiences in this short survey to help others make informed decisions.

User Feedback

Survey

Results

We do not yet have a sufficient number of survey participants to publish fair and accurate results for the Carbonhand.

As soon as we do, we’ll update this section.

For more information on why we’re conducting these surveys, please see Seeking User Feedback on Bionic Devices.

Click here for our main article on the Carbonhand.

For more information on assistive gloves in general, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

Neomano Glove User Satisfaction Survey

This page contains our User Satisfaction Survey for the Neomano Glove. If you are currently a Neomano Glove user or have been one previously, please share your experiences in this short survey to help others make informed decisions.

User Feedback

Survey

Results

We do not yet have a sufficient number of survey participants to publish fair and accurate results for the Neomano Glove.

As soon as we do, we’ll update this section.

For more information on why we’re conducting these surveys, please see Seeking User Feedback on Bionic Devices.

Click here for our main article on the Neomano Glove.

For more information on assistive gloves in general, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

NUADA Glove User Satisfaction Survey

This page contains our User Satisfaction Survey for the NUADA Glove. If you are currently a NUADA Glove user or have been one previously, please share your experiences in this short survey to help others make informed decisions.

User Feedback

Survey

Results

We do not yet have a sufficient number of survey participants to publish fair and accurate results for the NUADA Glove.

As soon as we do, we’ll update this section.

For more information on why we’re conducting these surveys, please see Seeking User Feedback on Bionic Devices.

Click here for our main article on the NUADA Glove.

For more information on assistive gloves in general, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

Carbonhand from Bioservo

The Carbonhand is a soft, assistive robotic glove that uses powered artificial tendons to augment the grip of people with insufficient strength in their hands.

What’s On This Page?

A Quick Look at the Carbonhand

The Carbonhand is for users who can move their hands but lack the strength to perform some daily activities. It uses powered artificial tendons to augment the gripping power of the thumb, middle finger, and/or ring finger, depending on its configuration. Perhaps most impressively, it uses pressure sensors in those three digits to intelligently respond to user actions, making the glove’s use highly intuitive.

Unfortunately, we don’t have a very good instructive video for the current version of the Carbonhand. The best we can do is this 2015 video of its predecessor, the SEM Glove. The Carbonhand has evolved since then, particularly in its control system and also with the introduction of a mobile app for configuration. But the core design remains the same:

Speaking of this design, here is a diagram of the Carbonhand’s main components, which we have copied from its User Manual:

The components are:

  1. the glove with embedded artificial tendons
  2. a lower arm strap, which helps keep the connector attached to the lower arm
  3. an upper arm strap, which helps keep the cord attached to the upper arm
  4. the connector, which connects the glove to the control unit
  5. the cord, which transmits sensory data and also houses the portion of the artificial tendons between the glove and the control unit
  6. the control unit, which receives data from the fingertip sensors (not shown in this diagram) and uses this data to control the activation and augmentative grip force of the glove by reeling in the tendons embedded in the glove; also contains the motors that do this work
  7. the Carbonhand mobile app, which allows users to configure the system to meet their personal needs

Finally, the Carbonhand 2.0 is in pre-launch. We’ll update this article as soon as we have more information about this new version.

Key Features

Grip Patterns & Control System

The Carbonhand has a sophisticated control system. It relies on pressure sensors in the tips of the glove’s thumb and two fingers. When the user attempts to grasp an object, the sensors detect the increased pressure and respond with proportional augmentation, i.e. if the user tries to grab an object with maximum force, the glove will respond with the maximum augmentation set in the configuration. Less user force results in less augmentation.

The beauty of this system is that it can be calibrated to the user’s individual needs. If a hand is extremely weak, its grip force may be substantially less than that of a stronger hand, yet the Carbonhand can still respond with its full range of augmentation thanks to personalized calibration.

This calibration applies to activation (the force needed to activate the Carbonhand), the sensitivity of the sensors, and the maximum allowable force. Maximum force and sensor sensitivity can be set universally or for each digit. This accommodates a situation where, say, a person’s thumb is substantially weaker than the middle and/or ring fingers.

If one of the digits is particularly weak and can’t generate enough pressure to activate the Carbonhand tendons, that digit can be paired with another digit. This allows the user to set up the Carbonhand so that, say, activating the middle finger can also activate the thumb.

All of these settings can be configured by the user via a mobile app. In addition to the default configuration, users can create up to three custom configurations and then quickly switch between these configurations using buttons on the control unit. This addresses scenarios where the user is performing different types of tasks, or perhaps if the user’s hand tires and needs additional responsiveness/augmentation.

To release the Carbonhand’s grip, the user simply has to relax his natural grip.

All in all, a very intuitive and impressive control system!

Proportional Force

The Carbonhand does support proportional force. The harder the user grips an object with his natural hand, the more the Carbonhand will augment the user’s grip, keeping in mind that the glove’s maximum augmentation is 20 newtons (roughly the force needed to hold 2 kilograms).

Sensory Feedback

The Carbonhand does not provide any sensory feedback to the user. However, the user continues to receive sensory feedback from his natural hand, especially its uncovered forefinger and pinky.

A future version of the Carbonhand will collect pressure sensor and usage data, which it will make available to healthcare providers as part of the glove’s role in rehabilitation. See Considerations Before Buying for more information on the rehabilitative aspects of the Carbonhand.

Size & Weight

The Carbonhand is available in six different sizes for both left and right hands: XS, S, M, L, XL, XLW. The Carbonhand control unit, upper arm strap, and lower arm strap also come in multiple sizes. It is clear from this approach that proper sizing should not be an issue.

The glove portion of the Carbonhand weighs 85 grams. The control unit weighs 600 grams. Because the control unit is attached to the upper arm (or the hip or to a wheelchair, etc.), weight should not be an issue.

Lift Capacity & Grip Strength

The Carbonhand can augment the user’s grip force by up to 20 Newtons of force. This consists of 8 Newtons for the thumb and 5 for each of the two augmented fingers.

By comparison, the average maximum grip force for women is 292 Newtons, and, for men, 517 Newtons. The average grip force used in daily activities is 70 Newtons.

Given this information, the Carbonhand is clearly not intended for heavy work. But it is suitable for tasks like eating, drinking, brushing one’s teeth, opening doors, etc.

We do not have an official lift capacity for the Carbonhand. However, 20 Newtons of added force roughly equates to 2 kilograms.

Durability

Based on the warranty policy, the glove component of the Carbonhand should last at least 6 months, while the control unit should last at least two years. Note that the glove can be replaced independently of the control unit.

Having said this, we rely mainly on feedback from our own User Satisfaction Survey as our main measure of durability. However, as this device is new to us (and therefore to our audience) it may be a year or two before we have sufficient feedback to publish this information.

Water and Dust Resistance

We do not yet have an official IP rating for the Carbonhand. But its User Manual clearly states that users should keep the Carbonhand “away from liquids and small particles. They can cause damage if they enter the Carbonhand.”

If you have to use the Carbonhand in a wet or dusty environment, note that you can wear a second glove over the Carbonhand’s glove.

Glove Options

The company that makes the Carbonhand, Bioservo, does not appear to sell any protective gloves for the Carbonhand. However, it can be used in combination with typical retail gloves.

Batteries

The batteries for the Carbonhand are designed to last approximately 8 hours depending on usage.

The system comes with a battery charger. We do not have any information on how long it takes to charge the batteries once they are fully drained, but most users will adopt a cycle of using the Carbonhand during the day and recharging it at night.

Additional battery packs can be purchased, and changing the battery is a simple operation, so one option for extended use might be to buy an additional battery pack to swap in when needed.

User Software

The Carbonhand provides a mobile app called the Carbonhand App for user configuration.

It allows users to define multiple personal profiles and to assign one profile to each other three profile buttons on the control unit.

What is a profile? It consists of four groups of settings displayed in this image of the app, again copied from the Carbonhand’s User Manual:

As mentioned in the Grip Patterns and Control System section, these settings include:

  • sensor sensitivity
  • maximum augmentation of gip force
  • the Caronhand activation threshhold, and,
  • finger activation, i.e. the ability to pair one digit to another for control purposes

Price

The Carbonhand currently sells for about $7,000 US. Additional glove components, which must be replaced every six months or so, depending on their use, sell for about $550 US.

Availability

The Carbonhand is currently available in Sweden, Norway, Belgium, Germany, Italy, and Japan.

Warranty

The Carbonhand comes with a 2-year warranty for everything except the glove and battery components.

The glove and battery components each have 6-month warranties.

User Feedback Survey & Results

Survey

Are you currently using the Carbonhand or have you used it in the past?

If so, why not help others by sharing your experiences in this quick survey:

Results

We do not yet have a sufficient number of survey participants to publish fair and accurate results for the Carbonhand.

As soon as we do, we’ll update this section.

Considerations Before Buying a Carbonhand

The first observation that we’d like to make about the Carbonhand is that its maker, Bioservo, is serious about assistive gloves. It helped create the industry and has been involved in groundbreaking research, field trials, and production of these devices since 2006. Additionally, it now makes an industrial assistive robotic glove that shares a lot of its technology with the Carbonhand.

Why is this important? Because Bioservo is getting feedback and gaining experience with almost every conceivable use of assistive gloves. Its new release of the 2.0 version of these gloves, along with its increased data capture and analysis of glove usage, point to a future of continued evolution and improvement, which is exactly what this company has demonstrated since its first prototype.

We’d also like to point out that the Carbonhand is proving very effective for rehabilitation. We’ll be elaborating on this topic in a separate article on the rehabilitative effect of assistive robotic gloves, but recent test data with the Carbonhand reveals the following positive impacts:

  • an increase in natural hand grip strength of 25 %
  • an increase in natural hand pinch strength of 14 %
  • distinct improved hand function

Combined with the ability of users (or their doctors) to adjust the Carbonhand’s calibration, this device may in fact help create a pathway to maximize rehabilitation while at the same time improving the user’s daily quality of life. This is no small achievement.

Is the Carbohand the best device in its class? We don’t know. For the first time, it seems to have significant competition from a startup called Nuada. But as we are merely observers of these technologies, we’ll let real users tell us which glove is better as they fill out our User Satisfaction Survey.

In the meantime, we think that those suffering from hand weaknesses should have an extremely positive view of the future, as it appears that companies such as Bioservo and Nuada are well on their way to resolving the disability aspects of having a weak grip.

For more information on these types of devices, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

Click here for more information on Bioservo.

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NUADA Glove

With its compact design and intuitive control system, the NUADA glove is the most exciting assistive hand device that we’ve seen so far.

What’s On This Page?

A Quick Look at the NUADA Glove

The following video provides an excellent overview of the NUADA glove:

As the video explains, sensors in the glove detect the user’s intent through natural hand movements. The glove then supports these movements using artificial tendons sewn into the fabric. The control system, battery, and motors required to support this are all housed in the wrist bracelet that appears, from the top, to be just a smartwatch, though there is slightly bulkier housing on the underside of the wrist.

All and all, this appears to us to be a very thoughtful design.

Key Features

Grip Patterns & Control System

It may seem odd to talk about grip patterns for a soft robotic glove, but the issue here is whether a device supports or limits all of the natural hand grips. For example, another glove, the Neomano, moves only the index and middle fingers, which it does in unison to provide a simple grip.

The NUADA glove does not impose these types of restrictions. It supports the independent movement of all five digits in a natural manner.

As mentioned, the control system is based on sensors in the glove that detect user intent via natural hand movements. However, the glove is not always active. To activate it, the user simply presses a button on the smartwatch.

Also, the artificial tendons never move the fingers on their own. Users must be able to move their fingers naturally even if they lack grip strength. Limited finger movement can be supported through calibration but this may require a special setup. If you truly lack the ability to move your fingers naturally, you may be better off with a device like the Tenoexo (if/when it is commercialized), which uses a combination of myoelectric sensors on the forearm and a more structured exoskeleton to help move the fingers.

When the user has gripped an object with the NUADA, the artificial tendons lock into place to support the full load. At this point, the user can relax his natural hand without losing his grip, which is only released when the user attempts to open his hand or if he releases the grip manually. However, there are some functions, such as operating a hand drill, that require the trigger finger (i.e. forefinger) to have full movement while the rest of the fingers remain locked. This is accomplished by moving a simple slider on the underside of the bracelet.

Proportional Force

The NUADA does not support proportional force. It closes to support the user’s grip and then locks. If the user is unable to generate sufficient force to properly grip an object (for example, something heavy and slippery), the NUADA allows the user to ratchet up the grip force through a series of repeated movements. In an earlier version of the hand, the user did this simply by repeatedly flexing his wrist. We do not yet know if this movement or an alternative movement will be required when the device is formally launched in December 2021.

Sensory Feedback

Sensory feedback is not provided by the NUADA glove. As the natural hand is still present, the user should still be able to rely on his natural senses.

Size & Weight

The NUADA’s dimensions are: 87.5x105x185.6mm (LxDxH).

Its weight is 270g.

Lift Capacity & Grip Strength

The NUADA can hold up to 40 kilograms, which is impressive. This is equivalent to 392 Newtons of force. For comparison, the average maximum grip force for women is 292 Newtons, and, for men, 517 Newtons. The average grip force used in daily activities is only 70 Newtons.

Put another way, the NUADA appears to have more than sufficient lift capacity and grip force for most daily activities.

Durability

The estimated lifetime for the mechanical components in the wrist bracelet is 2 years.

The estimated lifetime for the glove itself is 6 months. Note that you can swap in a new glove at any time (i.e. the wrist bracelet will work with the new glove without difficulty).

Other than these estimates from the manufacturer, we don’t yet have any durability feedback from our User Satisfaction Survey. Given that the NUADA won’t be officially launched until December 2021, we probably won’t have any usable feedback for a few years.

Water and Dust Resistance

As a textile, the glove handles both water and dust with ease. However, the bracelet is only water resistant. We do not yet have an official IP rating for either.

Glove Options

To help protect NUADA’s glove, you can wear another glove over it, though this is not required.

Batteries

The NUADA’s battery lasts roughly 16 hours if opened and closed once per minute. As that equates to nearly 1,000 open and closes, it should be more than adequate for a full day’s normal use.

The battery is charged via a USB-C cable. We do not yet have a full recharge time for the battery if it is fully drained, but most users will simply fall into a cycle of using the glove throughout the day and recharging it at night.

User Software

There are two aspects of user software for the NUADA glove. The first are the settings that users can modify through the smartwatch component of the bracelet. The second has to with data collected by the NUADA on the glove’s usage, which the user can view through software application on a mobile device. We do not yet have details on either of these functions, though the potential value of the data collection for patient monitoring and/or rehabilitation is obvious.

Price

The NUADA’s Pioneer Pack sells for a one-time payment of $4,053 U.S. less a 10% discount if you pre-order.

You can also purchase it for $91.50 per month over four years.

Note, the Pioneer Pack includes the complete system (bracelet plus glove), as well as free replacement gloves at six and twelve months after purchase (for a total of three gloves).

We do not yet have a separate cost for replacement gloves but will insert it here as soon as we do. Also, we are currently working on a price list for all assistive robotic gloves and will place a link here as soon as it is complete.

Availability

The NUADA glove appears to be available worldwide through direct shipment. However, we are working to confirm this.

Warranty

The NUADA offers a 12-month warranty for defective parts, materials, or manufacturing, but not for wear and tear on anything considered a consumable, such as the textile portion of the glove.

User Feedback Survey & Results

Survey

Are you currently using the NUADA glove or have you used it in the past?

If so, why not help others by sharing your experiences in this quick survey:

Results

We do not yet have a sufficient number of survey participants to publish fair and accurate results for the NUADA glove.

As soon as we do, we’ll update this section.

Considerations Before Buying a NUADA Glove

Until this device is on the market for a while and we get some direct consumer feedback, we have very little to say about it except this: after working the past two years on bionic limbs, which are often unaffordable for the vast majority of people who need them, we are very pleased to see a device like this available for less than $100 per month.

Looking at this from the broader perspective of human bionics overall, the more times that the industry can help millions of people overcome a disability, the more it should become obvious to society (and governments) that we should be doing this for all disabilities as a matter of basic human decency.

Otherwise, it is fair to note that a company called Bioservo makes a competing assistive glove called the Carbonhand. Is one glove better than the other? We have no idea, as we’ll let real users answer this question as they fill out our User Satisfaction Survey.

For more information on these types of devices, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

Click here for more information on NUADA.

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Neomano Glove

The Neomano is a soft, assistive robotic glove for people with movement in their wrist and arm but little to no strength in their hands.

What’s On This Page?

A Quick Look at the Neomano Glove

The Neomano glove is for users who have movement in their arm and wrist but very little or no strength in their hands. It actively assists users in closing their index and middle fingers to grasp objects. This first video does an excellent job of explaining how the glove works:

This next video does a good job of showing how the glove can be used and its benefits to end-users.

As you can see from these videos, despite its relative simplicity compared to some of the assistive robotic gloves now entering the market, this glove is a highly useful device. And at the relatively inexpensive price of $2,000 US, it is currently the most affordable device in this category.

Here is a better look at the components that make up the Neomano:

Neomano Components
  1. Glove
  2. Power Supply
  3. Remote control

Note, the neckstrap is just an alternative way to carry around the remote control.

Key Features

Grip Patterns & Control System

The Neomano doesn’t have grip patterns for its two powered fingers. The only action it allows is to close those two fingers in unison. However, as shown in the first video, users can manually position the thumb to form different grips such as closing the two powered fingers against the thumb to form a pinch grip versus wrapping the fingers around an object.

The control system is a Bluetooth wireless remote control that provides a Grip button to close the fingers and a Release button to release them. The closing action is powered and continuous, i.e. as long as you hold the Grip button down the fingers will continue closing until they’ve reached their limit. The mechanism used to do this consists of artificial tendons sewn into the glove that are reeled in by a motor attached to the side of the hand.

The release action is entirely passive, i.e. the motor simply releases the artificial tendons, which are elastic by nature. This allows the two fingers to return to their neutral position. Note, however, that to assist in the release process, the user does need some ability to relax their fingers.

Proportional Force

The Neomano does not support proportional force. It closes in a steady, consistent manner as long as the user continues to press the Grip button.

Sensory Feedback

The Neomano does not provide any sensory feedback. However, the fact that it is only a partial glove allows the user to receive normal sensory feedback from the uncovered portions of the hand.

Size & Weight

The Neomano is available in five different sizes:

Neomano Size Chart

We do not know the weight of the glove itself but the power supply only weighs 65 grams and the remote control only weighs 29 grams.

Lift Capacity & Grip Strength

The Neomano can lift up to 2 kilograms. This is equivalent to 20 Newtons of force. For comparison, the average maximum grip force for women is 292 Newtons, and, for men, 517 Newtons. The average grip force used in daily activities is 70 Newtons.

Given this information, the Neomano is clearly not intended for heavy work. But it is suitable for tasks like eating, drinking, brushing one’s teeth, opening doors, and carrying shopping bags that weigh less than 2 kilograms.

Durability

Marketing material for the Neomano claims that it is “lightweight, strong and flexible”. We have no way to independently verify this until we get durability feedback from real users through our User Satisfaction Survey.

However, the Neomano does come with a 1-year warranty. Also, the textile portion of the glove can be replaced independently of the other components.

Water and Dust Resistance

As a textile, the glove handles both water and dust with ease. We do not yet have any information on the water or dust resistance ratings for the other components. We will update this section as soon as we obtain this information.

Glove Options

We have not seen any instance of the Neomano being used with another glove. Nor does the company mention doing so.

Batteries

The Neomano’s remote control uses two AAA batteries that should last for roughly 150 days.

The power supply that drives the glove motor uses three AA batteries that can be either alkaline or rechargeable. Alkaline batteries will last a maximum of 11.5 hours of active use while rechargeables will last for a maximum of 23.5 hours.

Of note, the Neomano does not come with batteries. Users must purchase them on their own.

User Software

There is no mention of any user software with the Neomano.

Price

The Neomano sells for $2,000 US.

Availability

The Neomano currently appears to ship only to the U.S., U.S territories, and Canada.

Warranty

The Neomano comes with a 1-year warranty.

User Feedback Survey & Results

Survey

Are you currently using the Neomano glove or have you used it in the past?

If so, why not help others by sharing your experiences in this quick survey:

Results

We do not yet have a sufficient number of survey participants to publish fair and accurate results for the Neomano glove.

As soon as we do, we’ll update this section.

Considerations Before Buying a Neomano Glove

We’re excited to see such a helpful device available at such a reasonable price. Hats off to the company that makes the Neomano, Neofect, for delivering a device that is financially accessible. We’d also like to commend them for their innovative lineup of rehabilitation devices.

One key consideration for this type of product is whether you have sufficient arm, wrist, and hand movement to use it. For the Neomano, which actively closes the user’s index and middle fingers, movement in those fingers is obviously less important than it is for devices that do not provide active assistance. However, as mentioned, users do need some ability to relax their fingers to help return them to the neutral position after releasing the glove’s grip.

Otherwise, we will have little to say about the Neomano until we get sufficient feedback from our User Satisfaction Survey.

For more information on these types of devices, see An Introduction to Assistive Robotic Gloves.

Click here for more information on Neomano.

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